Psalm 1, 20 September 2015

These trees stand proud by the aters of a canal near Bruges

These trees stand proud by the waters of a canal near Bruges

Psalm 1 is a classic, and a sort of introduction to the psalms.

Apart from the clear call for an upright life — and the inevitable warning to the dissolute, which never includes us — its fluid poetry is the stuff psalms are made of:

Blessed is the one who does not walk in step with the wicked …

That person is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season and whose leaf does not wither—whatever they do prospers.Chaff

Not so the wicked! They are like chaff that the wind blows away.

This psalm, being first up in the book, attracted special attention for illuminated and historiated initial capitals in the old manuscript psalters.

Psalm 1, Beatus vir, in the Bedford psalter MS 42131 British Library.

Psalm 1, Beatus vir, in the Bedford psalter MS 42131 British Library.

They take the initial upper case capital B from the opening phrase in Latin, Beatus vir – blessed is the one.

The song itself, of course, is much more than a pretty face. It bears reading and rumination at length.

For South Woden members 

This will not get us to Paris

This will not get us to Paris

Your cyclist contingent has reached the far reaches of the internet in lovely Péronne in the Somme.

Apart from the pictorial evidence in the preceding part of this post, here’s further corroborative imagery.

A fair share of wind and rain have in no way reduced our enjoyment of the trip. I have sighted no good psalm quotes or other encounters worthy of another Front Fencing post (qv) but there’s not much opportunity for detailed posts on the slow barge to Paris.

Another day of headwinds

Another day of headwinds

image

7 thoughts on “Psalm 1, 20 September 2015

  1. Pingback: Skip and jump; 37, 92, 138 | Psalms in the South

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