Psalm 132 and 93, 22 Nov 15

If you want to concentrate on the Kingship of Christ, then you’d choose the second psalm listed, Psalm 93 (texts>):

The LORD is king, robed in majesty, girded with strength. He has established the world; it shall never be moved; your throne is established from of old; you are from everlasting. (93:1,2)

The associated Old Testament reading is the vision of Daniel, while the next bit from Revelation mirrors the theme of a mighty ruler.

DawnMeanwhile, Psalm 132 and its associated text from Samuel talk about David and the building of a holy place for God, the temple. As an aside, a strong theme of associating locations — temple, hill, city — with holiness, spirits or gods, runs through these readings. Such association has been powerful in many parts of the world. Stone rings, Mount Olympus, Fuji and topographic features around the world variously held special deities or seasonal significance in ancient religions, and of course the Australian aboriginal tradition to this day. Place is undoubtedly important in our lives and memories. Yet it seems to be a connection largely missing from the modern Western spiritual conscience. Whether this is good or bad I cannot say.

Music

Back to the king in Psalm 93. First cab off the rank in our ‘red book’ TiS is a Gelineau setting at No 51. It features two responses, which might be a nice and unusual touch.

Isaac Everett, one of the few authors who consistently edits text for gender inclusivity, offers a simple refrain drawing of verse 1 which he renders:

God is sovereign, robed in grandeur

Then the refrain itself suggests we alternate between ‘God is King/Queen’. Lightly syncopated à la Everett but not as tricky as some of his pieces.

PFAS, (back to ‘The Lord’) has only one responsive setting and it’s a typically easy yet harmonically interesting refrain.

William Boyce's bass solo

William Boyce’s bass solo

A bass solo written by William Boyce (1711-1779) is one of very few classical Psalm 93 songs out there in the ether.

Nevertheless there should be enough nice options to please all.

 

 

One thought on “Psalm 132 and 93, 22 Nov 15

  1. Pingback: Psalm 25, 29 Nov 15 | Psalms in the South

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