Crystal Ball, Apr-May 17

Crystal Ball

Crystal ball, by J Waterhouse. Image Wikimedia commons

Note: Another bulletin for South Woden members. Scroll down for weekly posts.

  • Psalm leaders are needed for this whole period.
  • Assuming leaders follow the Revised Common Lectionary and want to sing a psalm, here are weekly suggestions for April and May. 
  • Copies of PFAS in the Library, Helen has NCH, TEP available for download from churchpublishing.com. And anyway, you can always make up your own verse tone and refrain!

9 Apr. Liturgies are:

  1. Palms: Psalm 118, for which The Building Block by Paul Stookey is suitable.
  2. Passion: Psalm 31. PFAS 31C is a favourite that we have sung many times.

16Apr. Depending on the chosen liturgy, Psalm 118 and that building block come up again. A handy alternative is Together in Song 74.

23 Apr. Psalm 16. At this point three years ago, PFAS 16D was sung; it would be a fine choice again. (An enthusiastic quartet could also turn their attention to the Lassus motet, Benedicam Domino, three pages of nice SATB. All quite moderate and not too demanding … until the alto has a moment:ps16-lassus-moment

30 Apr. (John S in the lead.) In Dropbox sit two settings of Psalm 116: one is the PFAS version 116D, sung at Yarralumla as a small group three years ago. (Available but not published here for copyright reasons.) The second is for male voices in Eastern Orthodox style with chanted verses, enjoying the experimentation of harmonies changing under a lead voice on a monotone. PDF file here: Ps116 Orth.)

Initial decorated capital and text of verse 1, PSalm 23 in the Rutland Bible, c 1260. British Library MS 62965

Initial decorated capital and text of verse 1, PSalm 23 in the Rutland Bible, c 1260. British Library MS 62965

7 May. Psalm 23 arises again. Recommend a reprise of Paul Kelly’s Meet me in the middle of the air. If the team are available from singing El señor es mi pastor, PFAS 23I, a month ago, why not enjoy that again? If not, there are ten other settings in PFAS and dozens elsewhere.

14 May. Over the last few years for Psalm 31 we have used an excellent refrain from Psalms for All Seasons, 31C. Written by AnnaMae Meyer Bush, its four short phrases capture much of the wisdom of the Psalter: “My times are in your hands. You strengthen me in strife. My hope is in your word. Your love preserves my life.” Additionally, it’s worth a little rehearsal to learn the second (lower) echo part which adds to the musical delight.

21 May. PFAS again offers a good choice for Psalm 66, Cry out to God in joy, PFAS 66A. In our ‘red book’ TiS 36, All you nations sing out by Lucien Deiss, is a neglected but good alternative if you have a few singers who can read or learn the verses.

28 May. Psalm 68, which is akin to the previous week’s 66 in asking nations to sing with joy, concludes this two-month period of the web-master’s absence, posts having been scheduled long ago.

  • The setting in TiS 38 requires a sight-reader for the verses and some rehearsal,
  • PFAS has a possible responsorial setting in 68B.
  • Perhaps easier is a home-grown refrain that can be sung as a round (second entry, if only two parts, is at bar 3; or every bar if bravely designating more parts), the verses being chanted to a tone of choice (there are bunches of them in NCH and PFAS). We have sung this with the children:

ps68-refrainbol

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